Read Our First Aid Tips

Tips to Prevent Sunburn

Excessive sun exposure can result in painful sunburn and long term premature aging of the skin. Over time, intense repeated sun exposure can also result in skin cancer. Be proactive and avoid sunburn by:

  • Using a broad spectrum sunscreen at least SPF 15 or higher, such as Coppertone®
  • Staying in the shade and wearing protective clothing and sunglasses.
  • Avoiding sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun is strongest—even on cloudy days (sunburn is caused by UV radiation not temperature, so you can get sunburned even when it’s cloudy).

Ways to Treat Minor Sunburn

Act Quickly

Act Quickly

  • At the first sign of skin reddening or the tingling of a burn, get out of the sun and start treatment. (Most sunburns can be treated at home).
  • Sunburn can sneak up on you and can take four to six hours for the symptoms to develop.
Cool the Painful Sunburn

Cool the Painful Sunburn

  • Take a cool shower or bath.
  • Apply Solarcaine® Cool Aloe Spray or Gel for fast, cooling relief from painful sunburn (also moisturizes to help reduce dryness). Use as directed.
Drink Plenty of Fluids

Drink Plenty of Fluids

  • Drink plenty of water and watch for signs of dehydration (dry mouth, thirst, reduced urination, headache, dizziness and fatigue). Drinking water helps your body recover the fluid loss caused by sun exposure and heat.
Soothe the Skin

Soothe the Skin

  • Apply a moisturizer (such as Solarcaine® After Sun Moisturizers), when your skin begins to peel (usually within a few days), and continue using until the peeling stops.
Consult Your Doctor

Consult Your Doctor

  • If burn covers a large area, is blistering, or seems severe.
  • If you experience extreme pain, headache, confusion, nausea or chills.

Tips to Treat Minor Burns

No matter how careful we try to be while cooking, working or playing, sometimes accidents happen that result in painful first-degree burns. Fortunately, minor burns can be treated at home by doing the following:

Assess the Burn

Assess the Burn

  • First-degree burns are painful but minor. They turn red and may swell but you can treat them at home.
  • Second-degree burns can form blisters. The skin may be very red and painful.
  • Third-degree burns are the most serious burns, and burned areas may be charred black or white. The burns may not hurt because nerves have been damaged.
  • Call 911 or emergency medical help for major burns.
Cool the Burn

Cool the Burn

  • For minor/first-degree burns, run the area under cool water or apply a cool compress for 15 minutes to reduce swelling and ease pain.
Leave Blisters Alone

Leave Blisters Alone

  • Don't break small blisters. If blisters break, gently clean the area with soap and water, apply an antibiotic ointment and cover it with a bandage.
Relieve the Pain

Relieve the Pain

  • For painful minor burns try Solarcaine® cooling Aloe Spray or Gel. Use as directed.
  • If needed, consider an over-the-counter pain reliever.
Consult Your Doctor

Consult Your Doctor

  • If you develop large blisters
  • If the burn covers a large area of the body
  • If you notice signs of infection such as oozing from the wound and increased pain, redness and swelling.

Tips for Treating Minor Cuts and Scrapes

Fortunately, minor cuts and scrapes don’t require a trip to the emergency room, but you should take the following steps to keep them clean and prevent infections:

Wash Your Hands

Wash Your Hands

  • Washing your hands with soap and water will help prevent bacteria from getting into the cut and causing infection. If you’re on the go, use a hand sanitizer.
Stop the Bleeding

Stop the Bleeding

  • Apply gentle pressure to the cut with a sterile bandage for a few minutes to stop the bleeding.
Clean the Wound

Clean the Wound

  • Once the bleeding has stopped, rinse the cut under cool running water. Do not use soap, hydrogen peroxide or iodine as they may cause irritation.
Remove Dirt or Debris

Remove Dirt or Debris

  • Use tweezers cleaned with alcohol to remove dirt, gravel, glass or other materials from the cut.
  • You do not need to cover every cut and scrape; however, bandages can help keep the cut clean and bacteria out.
Relive the Itch and Pain

Relive the Itch and Pain

  • For pain or itch relief from minor cuts and scrapes, try Solarcaine® Cool Aloe Spray or Gel. Use as directed.
Consult Your Doctor

Consult Your Doctor

  • Watch for signs of infection and see your doctor if you notice any redness, increased pain, drainage, warmth or swelling.
  • Seek medical attention if the wound is deep and may require stiches, or if caused by glass or a rusty nail.
 

How to Treat Insect Bites

Most reactions to insect bites cause redness, itching, stinging or minor swelling. For mild reactions, take the following steps:

Wash the area

Wash the area

  • With soap and water.
 
 
Apply a cool compress

Apply a cool compress

  • Such as a cloth dampened with cold water or ice to reduce swelling.
 
To relieve pain and itching

To relieve pain and itching

  • Due to insect bites, use Solarcaine® Cool Aloe Spray or Gel. Use as directed.
 
Consult Your Doctor

Consult Your Doctor

  • If you experience signs of an allergic reaction or the symptoms last more than a few days.